1914

Home ] Up ] 1910 ] 1911 ] 1912 ] 1913 ] [ 1914 ] 1915 ] 1916 ] 1917 ] 1918 ] 1919 ]

 

Delineator March 1914Delineator March 1914Delineator March 1914Delineator March 1914, pg. 24, 25
 

     A very elegant and stylish street suit may be obtained if coat design 6727 and skirt design 6766 are worn together. As illustrated on the figure above, it is developed in serge, with a collar of corduroy. There will be required for the woman of medium size three yards and one-half of material fifty inches wide and five-eighths of a yard of contrasting material twenty-seven inches wide for the collar. Any one who contemplates selecting this costume, which embodies so many extremely attractive details, is sure to have the correct and very newest style. As the soft effects are so much more in vogue at present, this coat has usurped the place, with many people, of the one with such strictly straight-cut lines, more widely known as “tailor-made.”
     The coats of to-day are so simple in construction that the home dressmaker may feel confident of her ability to reproduce their smartness and excellence of line. Design 6727 is a good example of this type of coat. It has the long shoulder and is in twenty-eight-inch length at the back. The two-seam sleeves are sewed into slightly deep armholes and finished with a trimming piece which goes well with the nobby outside belt. Combined with a skirt developed from design 6766 it makes a modish and practical suit. The two-piece skirt has a slightly raised waistline and is made in clearing length. The top is wider than the lower edge which including extension measures about one yard and three-eighths in the medium size. The belt sections may be used or not. Made of serge, broadcloth or any of the corded woolens, this suit will be appropriate for wear in early Spring while the same design developed in taffeta, satin or silk crepe will prove excellent for the warm Summer days. When a woolen material is used, the bottom of the skirt should be finished with a braid. This suit may be worn with lingerie waists, but one of lace or net would be more appropriate for dress-up occasions. The coat suit seems to have reached the height of its popularity.
     Design 6727 may be obtained in seven sizes, from thirty-two to forty-four inches bust measure, price fifteen cents.
     Design 6766 may be obtained in six sizes, from twenty-two to thirty-two inches waist measure, price fifteen cents.

Delineator September 1914Delineator September 1914Delineator September 1914Delineator September 1914Delineator September 1914Delineator September 1914, pg. 52, 53
 

     In design 7112 and 7113 as here combined we have a splendid costume for general wear this season. The blouse is made of chiffon and the skirt of broadcloth and satin. To reproduce them in medium size one will need one yard and seven-eighths of forty-five-inch material for the blouse, with two yards and one-quarter of material fifty inches wide for the tunic and one yard of contrasting material thirty-six inches wide for the lower part of the skirt and the waistcoat belt, as well as one yard and three-quarters of thirty-six inch material for the foundation gores.
     Design 7112 is in raglan style and one has a choice of full-length or shorter sleeves. The stand-away collar is smart, but one may use the collar in high neck provided by the lining. Skirt 7113 shows a well-liked version of the Russian tunic. It is box-plaited and is attached at slightly raised waistline to a short three-piece foundation skirt in regulation waistline. The one-piece lower part is in clearing length and its lower edge measures about one yard and five-eighths with inverted plait. The waist-coat-belt may be used or omitted.
     Design 7112 in seven sizes, thirty-two to forty-four inches bust, price fifteen cents.
     Design 7113 in seven sizes, twenty-two to thirty-four inches waist, price fifteen cents.

McCall's March 1914McCall's March 1914McCall's March 1914, pg. 34, 35
 

     Misses’ Eton Suit with One-piece Skirt (15 cents). – For the young miss or small woman nothing could be more attractive than this simple suit with short Eton jacket. The pattern is cut in five sizes, from fourteen to twenty. Size sixteen requires four yards and five-eighths of forty-four-inch material.
     At the hem the skirt measures one yard and three-eighths.

 

Delineator July 1914Delineator July 1914Delineator July 1914, pg. 46, 47
 

     A smart and practical Summer costume is here developed from design 6987, using ratine, with collar and cuffs of organdy. For a woman of medium size, one will need to reproduce this attractive model four yards and one-eighth of ratine forty inches wide, with one-half yard of organdy twenty-seven inches wide for the stand-away collar, revers and cuffs.
     The waist is in the popular raglan style and may be made with full-length or shorter sleeves. If one wishes a plainer waist the revers may be omitted and one may use the collar in high neck provided by the body lining. The skirt is cut in clearing length and is attached at a slightly raised waistline. It is formed of two pieces lengthened at the front and sides by a circular flounce. There is a slight fullness at the top of the back. The lower edge measures about two yards in the medium size.
     This design is an excellent example of the simple and modish dress needed for general wear. It may be developed in such materials as ratine, corded cottons, linen, Japanese crepe, serge, gabardine and corded woolens.
     Design 6987 in eight sizes, from thirty-two to forty-six inches bust measure, price fifteen cents.

Designer Magazine June 1914Designer Magazine June 1914Designer Magazine June 1914Designer June 1914, pg. 18, 19, 23
 

     On page 19 a charming design for a miss or small woman is shown with the collar in stand-away style, with three-quarter-length raglan sleeves and a modish three-piece flare volant. On page 23 the model is repeated in a more simple development, the dart-fitted sleeves being in full length and the volant omitted. Then, too, a chemisette may be worn to fill in the open neck. The three-piece upper part of the skirt joins a two-piece lower part, the latter measuring at the lower edge about one and one-quarter yards in medium size. Linen, gingham, rep, poplin, gabardine, serge or taffeta is suitable, and if a more elaborate frock is wished, a cotton crepe, crepe de Chine, charmeuse, crepe meteor, voile or brocade may be used. Fashions for the young miss follow those of the elders in charmingly modified designs, and slender women often find them splendidly suited to their figures.
     The medium size requires four and three-quarter yards of thirty-two-inch cotton poplin and one yard of thirty-two-inch contrasting poplin.
     Dress 7604 in four sizes, fourteen to twenty years, fifteen cents.

Delineator July 1914Delineator July 1914Delineator July 1914Delineator July 1914, pg. 46, 47
 

     Another charming version of designs 6994 and 7000 is here developed in taffeta with flaring collar of lace and a flowered girdle. The bustle drapery is seen to advantage in this dressy model and proves itself a most attractive echo of the styles of a generation ago. One will need to reproduce the costume as illustrated four yards of material forty-four inches wide, with three-quarters of a yard of lace eighteen inches wide for the stand-away collar and full vest, seven-eighths of a yard of edging to trim the collar, as well as two yards and three-quarters of material twenty-seven inches wide for the short three-piece foundation skirt.
     The waist shows the body in one with the oversleeves which are finished at the elbow with a soft frill of the silk. The skirt is gracefully draped and has excellent lines which will make it becoming to almost every type of figure. Soft materials that drape well are best suited to designs of this sort, and one may use silk or cotton materials.
     Design 6994 in seven sizes, from thirty-two to forty-four inches bust measure, price fifteen cents.
     Design 7000 in nine sizes, from twenty-two to thirty-eight inches waist measure, price fifteen cents.

Delineator May 1914Delineator May 1914Delineator May 1914Delineator May 1914Delineator May 1914

Delineator May 1914, pg. 26, 27  

     It would be hard to find a style so universally becoming as the jumper waist here exemplified in design 6873. Combined with skirt 6874 it makes a costume of striking originality. For the dress as here illustrated there will be required in the medium size two yards and one-quarter of plain cotton crepe forty inches wide for the jumper and tunics, and four yards and one-eighth of figured crepe forty inches wide for the blouse with stand-away collar and skirt, with three yards and three-eighths of edging to trim, and two yards and one-eighth of thirty-six-inch material for a foundation skirt.
     In 6873 we have a simple blouse with body and sleeve in one combined with the jumper portion. For the high-neck style a collar is provided with the lining. Skirt 6874 is in clearing length with slightly raised waistline. Its air of smartness is due largely to the rippling of the double tunic. In the medium size the lower edge measures about one yard and one-quarter.
     Design 6873 in seven sizes, from thirty-two to forty-four inches bust measure, price fifteen cents.
     Design 6874 in seven sizes, from twenty-two to thirty-four inches waist measure, price fifteen cents.

Delineator May 1914Delineator May 1914Delineator May 1914Delineator May 1914Delineator May 1914

Delineator May 1914, pg. 28, 29        

     The modish costume developed from designs 6862 and 6863 is a pleasing expression of the latest features of the season’s styles. The bolero outline given the waist by the trimming pieces is further carried out by the use of a full vest here made of lace. The body is in one with the oversleeve, which may be in either of two lengths. A one-piece undersleeve is provided, but its use is optional, as is that of the draped vest. For a waist in high neck, the French lining provides a collar with straight or curved lower edge. The stand-away effect of the large collar is a particularly good feature of the design.
      Design 6863 is a most attractive version of the draped skirt. The drapery falls in soft folds at the sides and forms a tunic. The lower edge may be in either of two outlines and measures in the medium size about one yard and one-eighth. Cut in clearing length and with slightly raised waistline, the draped skirt is joined to a short three-piece foundation skirt in regulation waistline. For the costume as illustrated, there will be required in the medium size four yards and one-eighth of plain crepe de Chine forty inches wide for the skirt, collar, frill sections and trimming pieces, with one yard and three-eighths of forty-inch figured crepe de Chine for the body, one-half yard of all-over lace twenty-seven or more inches wide for the full vest, five-eighths of a yard of twenty-inch material for a foundation vest and two yards and one-eighth of thirty-six-inch material for a foundation skirt. Moiré, taffeta, satin, crepe de Chine, crepe meteor, silk crepe, cotton crepe, voile combined with net, lace and embroidery are among the materials recommended for these designs.
     Seldom has there been such a variety of plain and figured materials to choose for the Summer costume. The contrast of flowered and plain crepe de Chine is especially pleasing.
     Design 6862 may be obtained in five sizes, from thirty-two to forty inches bust measure, price fifteen cents.
     Design 6863 may be obtained in seven sizes from twenty-two to thirty-four inches waist measure, price fifteen cents.

McCall's June 1914McCall's June 1914McCall's June 1914, pg. 33, 35
 

     No. 5934, Misses’ Dress (15 cents). – The waist of this fascinating frock is made of shadow lace, with overwaist and tunic of tulle bound with silver. The one-piece dart-fitted skirt is of white taffeta. This pattern may be had in five sizes, fourteen to twenty. Size sixteen requires to make this dress as illustrated two yards and one-half of thirty-six-inch material for the skirt; one yard and three-fourths of forty-inch goods for the bretelles and pannier, and one yard of thirty-six-inch lace for the waist.
     The width of this skirt at the bottom is one yard and three-eighths.

 

Delineator October 1914Delineator October 1914Delineator October 1914Delineator October 1914Delineator October 1914

Delineator October 1914, pg. 68,69
 

      A truly bewitching costume for evening wear is here illustrated in designs 7156 and 7152. It will require in medium size three yards and three-eighths of forty-inch satin for the foundation skirt and plaited flounce, four yards of beaded net forty inches wide for the overdrapery, straight yoke and tunic, two yards and seven-eighths of lace edging sixteen inches wide for the full upper part of the waist and the shorter sleeves, one yard and one-eighth of flesh-color transparent material forty inches wide for the underbody (cut double) and the shorter sleeves (cut single), three yards and five-eighths of fancy bead banding to trim yoke and tunic and three yards of plain banding to trim overdrapery.
     7156 in seven sizes, thirty-two to forty-four inches bust, fifteen cents.
     7152 in eight sizes, twenty-two to thirty-six inches waist, fifteen cents.

Home ] Up ] 1910 ] 1911 ] 1912 ] 1913 ] [ 1914 ] 1915 ] 1916 ] 1917 ] 1918 ] 1919 ]

Please Email by clicking the link to the left    Copyright © 2002 Dressmakingresearch.com
Last modified: March 25, 2010
dressmaking history costume design research dressmaking history costume design research dressmaking history costume design research dressmaking history costume design research dressmaking history costume design research dressmaking history costume design research dressmaking history costume design research dressmaking history costume design research